Armistice Day Match at KFGA

It’s a tradition at my club to shoot WWI rifles at the November CMP match. 

I brought along my Rock Island 1903 and my Old Eddystone 1917. 

I shot the 1917 first. The 17 and I haven’t always gotten along. However I was able to focus on that tiny front sight due to some suprisingly good light. Slow prone went well. In both rapid and off hand I was low. I either moved the sight or changed my cheek weld but it happens. I’m happy I kept them in a group off hand. That had been an issue for me at Perry this summer.

I rarely shoot my Rock Island 1903. Not that there is anything wrong with it, in fact it’s nice to shoot as it has USMC sights and a nice smooth action. 

Anyway, excuses aside, I did okay with that old rifle. I had some trouble remembering how the windage worked and bounced back and fourth across the target in slow prone. Four MOA per 1/4 turn is a little delicate.
I haven’t been happy with my offhand with the wood guns all season, but I managed to post one of my better off hand scores with this rifle. It turns out trigger control is important!

Last Stand in Dixie: Last XTC Matches of 2016

Ok,  I suppose Delaware is not technically Dixie but it is south of the Mason-Dixon line and Camp Butner is for sure, so close enough.

To wrap up the 2016 Service Rifle Season GTB shooting team headed to Camp Butner for the NSSC NC Championship and EIC.  The NC Championship was a 1000 agg on Saturday. It was a beautiful summer day. Well, summer for us Yankees I assume, high 70s is what they consider fall in NC. 

During the 1000 agg I cleaned 300 for the first time! 

The rest of the match was fairly lackluster including a hot mess at 600.

The EIC the next day started out soggy off hand. I worked to make a come back but couldn’t quite make it. I ended with a 469 which wasn’t awful but a good 10 points below the cut.


Looking for some redemption the next weekend I drove down to the beach for Bridgeville’s last 800 agg of the season. My new Nightfore service rifle scope had shown up while I was at Camp Butner and this was its first trial. 

The match went well and was a nice end to the season. I posted a decent high end Master score and cleaned sitting for the first time! The new scope worked very well.  I’m looking forward to putting it through its paces next season.


Don’t worry this isn’t really the end of the season, there are still a couple wood gun matches left, maybe some rimfire, and of course hunting season!

Service rifles, Bolt Guns and Garands at York and Kimberton.

I’ve been busy the past few weekends! 

Shot some good some not so good and some mediocre matches.

Started off with a 600 agg service rifle match at Kimberton.


It was a 100 yard walk and paste. I shot a solid  Master score, came in second overall, and cleaned my first target in competition!

      
Headed across the river the next morning for York Riflemen’s last 800 agg of the season. I dropped too many points in rapid prone in this one blowing the group out the other side by over correcting. Still squeaked in a master level score. 


Took a few days off from shooting to work for a few days (boring) then hauled back to York for their fall Garand match. The weather was not cooperating but they ran two relays twice. So we were able to reenter which was fun. I shot my Garand first and posted some ugly scores then my A3 and posted a better score but still missed the cut. I’m blaming that one on the two 8s I managed in prone due to the rain. Totally not that 5 off hand!

The next weekend I had big plans to haul to Bridgeville and shoot their full course 800 agg. But hurricane Matthew had other ideas. So I headed to a walk and paste at Palymra Sportsmans Club. They do two back to back walk and paste 800 aggs which is a bit grueling. But it’s under a roof and no pit duty which is nice. 

I did well in the first match and not so well in the second. The second match I was soft on the ends. I had trouble finding my groove in off hand and not really sure what I was doing in slow prone.

It was a nice match and good practice. I’m going to try and go to more of those matches next season.

Just a couple more weeks until my last EIC and XTC match of the year!

MD State Championship

I headed down to the hollar for Fort Hill’s season end championship match. The
CMP state championship match is a 800 point aggregate following CMP rules which means no sighters and starting from standing.

It was a beautiful day in western Maryland for a match. I was on relay one so I shot first. For a nice change, off hand went well. I was able to get into my “fast and angry” pace, I’m not sure why but that seems to really help my off hand. Good pit service helps me keep pace and in this case I managed to post a 180, not my best but factoring in a 6 I slung on the target when I wasn’t quite ready to do so I’ll take it.
Sitting went great for the first 2 rounds. Then my bolt didn’t lock back. I didn’t do a great job trouble shooting it and only got 3 out of the second mag before the target went down. For 3 fast shots they stayed in the middle, even when the middle was a twelve o’clock 6. 

The second string went well enough with a 95. The excuse I’m going with there is my between string routine was thrown off. 

It turned out the gas rings in my bolt were long past their prime. 

In the middle at 300 I dropped 7/200 most of those due to a bad wind call on the first string. 

Out back was a little odd. My 600 yard zero for this range gave me a six o’clock 9. I corrected for it and moved into the X. Then shot 3 was an eleven o’clock 7 more or less twice the correction I had just put on. Baffled, and with nothing to lose after saving 5 rounds at 200 I sent another which neatly went within a couple inches of the 7. Turned the knobs (and tapped on them) to the X and managed to stay more or less in the middle after that. 

Looking over my data book this doesn’t seem to be the first time this happened. While it easily could have been me I’m starting to doubt the performance of my Leupold VXR 1-4. 

I had planned on staying for the EIC the next day and making my last stand as I have already shot four of the five allowed EIC matches. But with my busted rifle I decided to limp home and try again in October.

Lesson leanred, Check your equipment before the match!

Leg Points at New Holland!

New Holland typically runs a generally well attended CMP EIC Match in April, but this year the weather just wouldn’t cooperate. Heavy rain the first try and then snow on the rain day cancelled the match twice! But  finally in July the weather worked out.

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While I still consider Kimberton my “home club” I am a member of New Holland Rifle and Pistol and spend a fair bit of time there practicing.

It was hot and humid again, but slightly cooler than it had been during the week.

There was a “P100” format match first to help everyone verify their zeros and get those 7s out of their system. Boy did I have some 7s to get out. I opened with my worst off-hand ever with the A4. Not one but two 7s and a few 8s to boot to total a gross 82. I mostly blame trying to work with a bad patch of ground fighting a downward slope.

The rest of the P100 went better. I made a nice group rapid prone at 300 and noted its poor placement in the 9 ring, which I corrected for the next match. Out back at 600 I posted a 96. My 600 come ups were predictable as I have spent plenty of time on that back berm practicing and my Leupold tracked right to where it should.


After turning in our score cards and grabbing a cold drink from the truck it was back to 200 to do it again for a 50 round CMP national match course, this time for points.

Remembering my struggle with slope I found a better piece of dirt to make my stand this time and posted a 93 off-hand! I got a little frustrated circling the 10 but I kept them in the black.

CMP rules require firing sitting from standing which can be its own special challenge. I borrowed a trick I learned from the Internet and parked my shooting cart behind me which I use to help me stand up in a less dramatic fashion. These methods helped me keep both feet in the same spot. When I was a bit larger, I was only keeping my right foot in the same place which made re-locating my NPA a challenge. I managed to keep most of the shots in the middle and posted a 97 in sitting.

Back to 300 for rapid prone I posted another 97, this one I worked a little harder for with an 8 low right, my “go to” spot if I goof up my breathing.
Spent some time in the pits after 300 nervously looking over my data book and feeling out where others stood.

Kirby says “way to go”

Back at 600 my wind call and elevation were right on and first shot was a 10. I wasn’t super happy with my position but assumed I could make it work. Turns out I was wrong, and pulled a 6:00 seven. I started seeing flashes of screwing up my nice short line scores with a hot mess out back. I took a minute to reset and worked my way back into the 10 where I stayed for all but two rounds for the rest of the string.

Out Back

Posted a 479 in the end. I knew there was a 480 to beat, and 3 legs to give out. So, I was nervous as the match director added up the final results. I managed to come in second for my first points since Small Arms Firing School at Perry in 2015, just less than one year since my first Across the Course match!

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My shooting buddy managed to take the last leg, which we like to call “the foot” so “GTB shooting team” had a good day!

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